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Language Arts > Reading | Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 | Lesson Plans

READING A NARRATIVE POETRY: THE SONG OF HIAWATHA - POWERPOINT PRESENTATION

Attributes
subject

Reading

grades

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

editable
No
author
John Dsouza
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About This Product

This PowerPoint Presentation is perfect for teaching Reading Skills through a Narrative Poetry - The Song of Hiawatha. These no prep activities would be great for ELA lessons or ELA centers. Your students will love these ready to use exercises that are well planned for student engagement.

After completing this New Bloom’s Taxonomy-based lesson students will be able to:

  • Find the meaning of challenging words and expressions in the poem.

  • Identify the key ideas of the poem.

  • Use textual clues to answer the retrieval and inferential questions.

  • Analyse the poem to find its poetry elements – genre, message, tone, context, perspective, point of view, structure, rhyme scheme, purpose and metre.

  • Evaluate the poet’s use of personification, hyperbole, imagery, repetition, alliteration and onomatopoeia.

  • Write a summary, make a character description, explain the reader impact of figurative language and create a critical appreciation of the poem.

Here are some other possible uses for these in your classroom:

  • To challenge early finishers

  • For effective tutoring

  • As ESL stations and sub tubs

  • As holiday work and homework

  • For small group collaborations

  • For an end of unit assessments 

  • For reinforcement and enrichment

What's Included

This Download Includes:

TEXT

POEM: An Extract of “The Song of Hiawatha” by W. H. Longfellow

REMEMBERING

EXERCISE 1: Match the words (1-14) with their meanings (A-N).

EXERCISE 2: Match the adjectives (1-8) with the words they describe (A-H) in the poem.

EXERCISE 3: Look at the sentence structure in the poem. Sometimes the poet changes the order of the words in a sentence so that something important appears as the first word. Match the sentences (1-4) with their correct word order (A-B).

UNDERSTANDING

EXERCISE 4: Read the sentences about the poem and decide if they are true or false.

EXERCISE 5: What does Hiawatha learn about his “Chickens” and “Brothers”? Complete these sentences with the given words.

APPLYING

EXERCISE 6: Answer the following retrieval questions.

EXERCISE 7: Answer the following inferential questions.

ANALYSING

EXERCISE 8: Follow the specified criteria to identify the poetry elements of the poem.

EXERCISE 9: Answer the following questions to demonstrate your knowledge of poetry elements – Part 1-3.

EVALUATING

EXERCISE 10: Follow PEE model to evaluate the poet’s use of personification and hyperbole in the poem.

EXERCISE 11: Follow PEE model to evaluate the poet’s use of imagery in the poem.

EXERCISE 12: Answer the questions to check your understanding of the figurative language used in the poem.

EXERCISE 13: Follow PEE model to evaluate the poet’s use of repletion, alliteration and onomatopoeia in the poem.

EXERCISE 14: Answer the questions to check your understanding of the sound poetic devices used in the poem.

CREATING

EXERCISE 15: Briefly summarise the meaning of the poem.

EXERCISE 16: Follow the characterisation guide to describe the character of Nokomis, based on what you learn in the poem.

EXERCISE 17: Follow the prompt to make a critical appreciation of the poem.

EXERCISE 18: Follow the PEEL model to explain the reader impact of the use of personification in the poem.

EXERCISE 19: Follow the PEEL model to explain the reader impact of the use of hyperbole in the poem.

EXERCISE 20: Follow the PEEL model to explain the reader impact of the use of imagery in the poem.

EXERCISE 21: Follow the PEEL model to explain the reader impact of the use of sound poetic device in the poem.

Resource Tags

poetry comprehensionclassroom resourceslesson planspowerpoint presentationbloom's taxonomy-based